Condi, North-Korea, China, God Bless America…

JIWON:

I did watch the NYP’s concert in North Korea, and it was an accident. Usually, I’m not allowed to watch the Classical Music on TV in my house for fear that family members discuss my future life in their favorite way. I was in the computer room when the last part of their Wagner performance was suddenly performed in the living room. Then surprisingly, their favorite subject was not music but Dr. Condoleezza Rice, so I was able to join the dinner table and watch the performance.

So, I missed the most part of their Wagner. I don’t regret and don’t plan to watch it. It was slightly higher than the level of normal New York sound. Anyway, there are my favorite musicians in this ensemble and I wanted to check their performance. What the heck! A real disappointment…

Then suddenly… What a terrific acoustics of the concert hall! Well, it’s a famous story that a cultural taste of Kim Dynasty is very similar to Hitler’s. Soon, the members started to listen to and communicate each other. Something started to hook my attention; here and there and here and there… then I was counting. One, two, three, four, five, six…

They were not jewel-like. They were Jewels Playing the Thankless Roles. One of them looked real handsome with his instrument, so I wanted to read his resume… I can’t find the same handsome face in their homepage…

But I am sure this concert’s solo flute was Robert Langevin, who seems to be the only token. I hope this guy to find my writing. I read his resume, and said, “Hum… no wonder…”

Please imagine that this New York guy plays Pahud’s imstrument. You suddenly compare this Golden Flute sound from New York with Pahud’s present cheap sound in Berlin. I’m curious. Has he ever experienced this kind of moments during his life time? If so, how many times? If so, does he know why? His performance just reminded me of Donald Peck, the former solo flute of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Toward the end of my American study, I couldn’t sit straight whenever I visited their live performances, because some fabulous members treated me as their mentor. Donald Peck was in the front line. It was like that he was my lovely student who wanted to show me how much he wanted to follow his maestro, Daniel Barenboim. I just wanted to find a hole to hide… Then, I returned to Korea and started to listen to his old recordings. How many valuable moments had he created in his full, silvery sound?

Please, look at his face and read his writing. Strong ego with purity in his eyes… This I believe is the real American musician. I hope Mr. Robert Langevin join the club.

Then, please compare his lifelong achievement with the present Solo Flute in Chicago. While checking Bashkirova-Festival, it was a real shock to find his inferior posture, which was getting worse as time went by. Yet, this sound has been treated as a brilliant soloist more and more, inside and outside the orchestra. What does it mean? Speechless…

In recent days… how many American ensembles has I listened to? I was too tired to listen to all of them. Cleveland Symphony Orchestra members’ pro-ensemble really made me cry. Some moments of San Francisco Symphony Orchestra members were terrific. I was in a car and the old lady, who was sitting next to me and sleeping with her nickname as “the silly ears,” suddenly woke up to ask me if it was the BPO. I never knew that she had an ability to distinguish orchestral sounds by “her ears” until she questioned that it sounded better than the BPO…

Now, I watch those Jewels in the New York Philharmonic.

Basically, those American members don’t have to read my Barenboim-message. They even don’t need my whatsoever advice. All they need is to remember their performance that day to feedback and prepare their next performance. I promise. They will make it.

May God Bless American Jewels…

The NYP’s American music also ended with the typical New York Sound, which was slightly higher than their standard, only because none of members dared to break the wall, perhaps due to… Yet, I was still able to imagine my favorite interpretation to play American music, because I actually heard it from the member of Boston Symphony OrchestraI am now too tired to check my ears with the forumites, but I don’t think there is something wrong with my analysis. I seriously recommend their New Music Director NOT to destroy his Jewels’ Instinct.

I was reading NYT’s articles because

1. I wanted to know more about Chinese music society. I know what has been happening there in recent days. My writing on Lang-Lang was purely based on what I’ve observed, heard, and read. I was right… in the end, Lang-Lang will be remembered only as a passing vogue…

2. I wanted to find the exact statements from American Government officials.

Thanks to Condi’s smart decision, I was able to watch their performance, and write what I wanted to write.

Damn tired… but will finish my writing as soon as possible. I know who should receive my mail, and who will welcome my Barenboim-message. I know how to make the content. I just don’t know how to start my very first sentence to my twin sister in Barenboim’s Israel…

P.S.: I still can not understand why Maestro Maazel makes music like this. There were so many moments he could watch. It’s real weird because he was born this talent… I have to write this because… While re-tracking down Bashkriova’s brilliant prostitution in recent years, I started to find all the luxuries this shit purchased with my money. Once I get my money, Barenboim will be in his debts. Then, all his friends, whose dying career my miserable life happened to save, would have to save his financial difficulties.

Times Topics: New York Philharmonic in Asia

JIWON: BRAVO, PHIL! I can’t sleep… It was the most terrific moment in my life~~~ But, someone knows why he had to miss the notes? Before PHIL and after PHIL? P.S.: One more jewel is found in the NYP. 

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/25/arts/music/25prep.html?ref=music (February 25, 2008) Headed for Korea, Orchestra Gets Tips

(…) The United States government supports the visit as a step toward warming up the relationship with North Korea, although progress on having that country end its nuclear weapons program has stalled.

“The North Korean regime is still the North Korean regime,” said Condoleezza Rice, the secretary of state, in a briefing in Washington last week. “And so I don’t think we should get carried away with what listening to Dvorak is going to do in North Korea.”

Nevertheless, she said, “to the degree that the North Korean people have some access to the outside, that they know that there is something else in life, I think it’s a good thing.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/27/world/asia/27symphony.html?ref=music (February 27, 2008) Philharmonic Stirs Emotions in North Korea

(…) Still, there was little indication that the good will generated by the visit would affect a critical issue: North Korea’s nuclear program, and efforts to determine the extent of it. At a banquet following the concert, Song Sok-hwan, the vice-minister of culture, said: “All the members of the New York Philharmonic opened the hearts of the Korean people.” He called the concert “an important occasion to open a chapter of mutual understanding between the two countries.”

It did not appear that the country’s leader, Kim Jong-il, was present at the concert. High-ranking officials did attend, including the vice president of the Presidium of the Supreme People’s Assembly, the vice culture minister and the chairman of the Pyongyang People’s Committee, akin to mayor.

In Washington, on Tuesday, the White House played down the significance of the concert, while criticizing the North for failing to meet its commitments to disarm. Dana Perino, the White House press secretary, said the performance neither hurt nor helped American diplomatic efforts.

“At the end of the day, we consider this concert to be a concert,” Ms. Perino said, “and it’s not a diplomatic coup.” (…)

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Times Topics: New York Philharmonic in Asia

Catching a Streamed-In Philharmonic Live From North Korea By ANTHONY TOMMASINI: That a stream of the New York Philharmonic’s performance made its way out over the Internet was nothing short of amazing.

February 27, 2008 MORE ON THE 2008 NORTH KOREA TRIP AND: COMPUTERS AND THE INTERNET, CLASSICAL MUSIC, PUBLIC BROADCASTING SERVICE, WNET

North Koreans Welcome Symphonic Diplomacy By DANIEL J. WAKIN: Hinting at a wider cultural thaw, a concert by the New York Philharmonic was the first permitted by an American orchestra in the country.

February 27, 2008 MORE ON THE 2008 NORTH KOREA TRIP AND: INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, CLASSICAL MUSIC

North Korea Seeks a Clapton Concert By THE NEW YORK TIMES: On Tuesday North Korean officials invited the superstar rock guitarist Eric Clapton to perform there, according to a representative for the North Korean Embassy in London.

February 27, 2008 MORE ON THE 2008 NORTH KOREA TRIP AND: MUSIC, KIM JONG IL

For the Press, a Closely Guided Tour of Pyongyang By DANIEL J. WAKIN: North Korean officials gave journalists a scripted tour of Pyongyang’s sites, but there were spontaneous moments.

February 27, 2008 MORE ON THE 2008 NORTH KOREA TRIP AND: CLASSICAL MUSIC, PYONGYANG (NORTH KOREA)

North Korea Invites Clapton, Too By THE NEW YORK TIMES: On Tuesday North Korean officials invited the superstar rock guitarist Eric Clapton to perform there, according to a representative for the North Korean Embassy in London.

February 27, 2008 MORE ON THE 2008 NORTH KOREA TRIP AND: MUSIC, PYONGYANG (NORTH KOREA), CLAPTON, ERIC

North Korea Welcomes New York Philharmonic By DANIEL J. WAKIN: The orchestra was presented with a gala performance of traditional music and dance and an endless banquet.

February 26, 2008 MORE ON THE 2008 NORTH KOREA TRIP AND: UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, MUSIC, CLASSICAL MUSIC, PYONGYANG (NORTH KOREA)

In Visit, Cellist’s Quest for Lost Chord to His Youth By DANIEL J. WAKIN: Now in Pyongyang as a cellist with the New York Philharmonic, Valentin Hirsu is asking about the fate of three Korean boys from his music school in Romania.

February 26, 2008 MORE ON THE 2008 NORTH KOREA TRIP AND: CLASSICAL MUSIC, ROMANIA

Headed for Korea, Orchestra Gets Tips By DANIEL J. WAKIN: A day before the New York Philharmonic arrived in North Korea on a landmark trip, a Western diplomat based in Pyongyang addressed the players in preparation for their journey.

February 25, 2008 MORE ON THE 2008 NORTH KOREA TRIP AND: CLASSICAL MUSIC, PYONGYANG (NORTH KOREA)

China and the Philharmonic, in Harmony

China and the Philharmonic, in Harmony By DANIEL J. WAKIN: The Philharmonic made its debut in Shanghai, and it was far more than a simple in-and-out pair of concerts.

February 23, 2008 MORE ON THE 2008 NORTH KOREA TRIP AND: CLASSICAL MUSIC, SHANGHAI (CHINA), MAAZEL, LORIN

Concert in North Korea to Be Broadcast Live By DANIEL J. WAKIN: The North Korean government has agreed to a live national broadcast of the New York Philharmonic’s concert in Pyongyang next week.

February 19, 2008 MORE ON THE 2008 NORTH KOREA TRIP AND: MUSIC, PYONGYANG (NORTH KOREA), PUBLIC BROADCASTING SERVICE, MEHTA, ZARIN

PBS Will Broadcast Concert From North Korea By DANIEL J. WAKIN: In an unusual arrangement, ABC News will cooperate with WNET, New York’s public television station, to produce the broadcast.

February 7, 2008 MORE ON THE 2008 NORTH KOREA TRIP AND: CLASSICAL MUSIC, TELEVISION, POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC BROADCASTING SERVICE, WNET, WOODRUFF, BOB

Eager South Koreans Tour a Semi-Open City in the North By NORIMITSU ONISHI: Scenes from a recent visit to Kaesong, North Korea, during a rare period of relative openness in a country which strictly controls even the glimpses it provides of itself to the outside.

January 4, 2008 MORE ON THE 2008 NORTH KOREA TRIP AND: ARMAMENT, DEFENSE AND MILITARY FORCES, KOREAN WAR, TRAVEL AND VACATIONS, SOUTH KOREA

Philharmonic Gets a Taste of Pyongyang DiplomacyPhilharmonic Gets a Taste of Pyongyang Diplomacy By DANIEL J. WAKIN: North Korea’s top diplomat and orchestra officials held a news conference to discuss a coming performance.

December 12, 2007 MORE ON THE 2008 NORTH KOREA TRIP AND: CLASSICAL MUSIC, PYONGYANG (NORTH KOREA), STATE DEPARTMENT, HILL, CHRISTOPHER R, MEHTA, ZARIN, KIM JONG IL

Another Movement of Musical Diplomacy By DANIEL J. WAKIN: If North Korea keeps its promises, potentially millions of its citizens are likely to hear “The Star-Spangled Banner” in a place long subjected to anti-American propaganda.

December 11, 2007 MORE ON THE 2008 NORTH KOREA TRIP AND: CLASSICAL MUSIC, PYONGYANG (NORTH KOREA), STATE DEPARTMENT, BERNSTEIN, LEONARD, KIM JONG IL

Philharmonic Agrees to Play in North Korea By DANIEL J. WAKIN: In the first significant cultural visit by Americans, the New York Philharmonic plans to visit Pyongyang.

December 10, 2007 MORE ON THE 2008 NORTH KOREA TRIP AND: ATOMIC WEAPONS, MUSIC, UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, CLASSICAL MUSIC, PROPAGANDA, PYONGYANG (NORTH KOREA), STATE DEPARTMENT, KIM JONG-IL, BUSH, GEORGE W

Concert Without Strings By RICHARD V. ALLEN and CHUCK DOWNS: A final decision by the New York Philharmonic on whether to perform in North Korea merits the most careful consideration.

October 28, 2007 MORE ON THE 2008 NORTH KOREA TRIP AND: INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, CLASSICAL MUSIC, POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT, PYONGYANG (NORTH KOREA)

Orchestra Considers Invitation to Korea By DANIEL J. WAKIN: New York Philharmonic officials were returning yesterday from an exploratory trip to North Korea with glowing reports of concert possibilities in the capital.

October 13, 2007 MORE ON THE 2008 NORTH KOREA TRIP AND: CLASSICAL MUSIC, STATE DEPARTMENT, MEHTA, ZARIN, KIM JONG IL

New York Philharmonic Might Play in North Korea By DANIEL J. WAKIN: The exploratory trip comes at a time of what appears to be a softening in relations between the United States and North Korea.

October 5, 2007

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