Barenboim: Berlusconi’s Italy Shall Be Blessed With Healthy Feminism & Healthy Opposition!

🙂 Italy-Belcanto > Barenboim and La Scala >
12 =*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*
Toward Italian Healthy Feminism…

How Silvio Berlusconi Uses Women on TV Nov 20, 2009‎ / By (American) Time
(…) Italy has the lowest percentage of working women in Europe. Only 2% of top management positions in Italy are held by women, less than in Kuwait. In last year’s Global Gender Gap report from the World Economic Forum, Italy ranked 67th out of 130 countries. Such figures are particularly shocking for women like Elisa Manna, who is old enough to remember Italy’s muscular feminist movement of the 1970s. “Back then, young women wanted to become doctors, lawyers — professional people,” says Manna, director of the Department of Cultural Policies Centre for Social Studies and Policies (CENSIS) in Rome. “It was terrible to get ahead in your profession because you are beautiful. Now, it’s absolutely the reverse: if you use your body, your beauty, you’re clever. You’re pragmatic.” Quite so. (…) But it will take more than that to challenge Berlusconi. Italy’s center-left opposition is in disarray, as usual, having just elected its second new leader in six months. (…) Imagine: women who are not young and not beautiful, daring to show their faces on Italian TV. In Silvio Berlusconi’s Italy, that really is a new idea.

Crucifix is a cross Europe is not allowed to bear Nov 19, 2009 / By Sfexaminer.com, Meghan Cox Gurdon
(…) Italy has drifted away from the old faith — birth rates are among the lowest in Europe, and only 21 percent of Italian Catholics said they attended weekly Mass, as of 2006 — but the cross has remained, ubiquitous and familiar, a pillar of the national character. (…)

Italian women have to fight sexism in every aspect of their lives Sep 20, 2009 / By The Observer, Maria Laura Rodotà
With men routinely taking lovers and expecting their wives to cook, clean and look elegant, Silvio Berlusconi is only part of the problem (…) Today’s average Italian woman is a hybrid incomprehensible to foreigners: she’s overdressed, overworked and has the lowest self-esteem in the western world. If she has a job, she has to work overtime inside and outside the home (Italian men rarely clean or cook, and spend less time looking after the children). Unwritten laws demand that she is cute, thin, elegant and well made-up. For Italian men it’s normal to have a wife and a lover, which is why many have been amused by the adventures of the prime minister. The number of women in positions of power is small; in politics, almost all owe their status to men. The fear of being caricatured as a bitter feminist (who probably hasn’t got a sex life) is always strong. Women who overcome that fear are often ridiculed. (…) they can be anti-Berlusconi, yet make jokes about women Berlusconi-style (…)

Italy politics: Sex, thighs and ‘Videocracy’ Dec 14, 2009
(…) When the producer of “Il Corpo delle Donne” (The Body of Women) takes the 25-minute video around to schools, she asks girls what they want to be someday. She said, “The most popular calling for girls 16 or 17 years old is to be a ‘VELINA.’ I don’t think Berlusconi had a strategy to sedate women, but TV does drug women who watch it five, six hours a day. All the people who watch a lot of TV vote for him, especially women in the 50-to-70 age range.” (…) Italy’s unusual blend of sex and politics didn’t begin with Berlusconi. Twenty years ago it catapulted Ilona Staller, the former porn-star known as Cicciolina, into Parliament. But Berlusconi and his media empire have taken this mix to a more systematic, mass-cultural level. Still, Berlusconi remains highly popular, and so do the onscreen VELINE. (…) Bindi notes that Italy’s relatively low rate of women in jobs, and its generous early retirement system, give people ample time to watch TV.

Letter from Rome: The Feminine Mistake Dec 14, 2009 / By CBC.ca
A new documentary decries the depiction of women on Italian TV
Comments for this article 30
COMMENT-1 wrote (Posted 2009/12/14 at 4:37 PM ET): This is no surprise to me. I am surprised how long it took for someone to speak out. The last time I was in Italy was about ’93. I remember vividly siting beside my wife’s grandmother while we ate. The television blaring and everyone speaking Italian seemed very confusing to me. There was a television in every room and they were all on. We watched tv while we ate. Every show was a game show that depicted women in bathing suites with men fully dressed make rude remarks (or so it appeared because I don’t understand the language). At the time it seemed intriguing how a very catholic society would stand for it, let alone watch it. But I now realize the catholic church treats women with the same disrespect that the Italic culture does. The catholic church teaches by example that women are only good for certain things. Woman are not allowed to become priest for example. I only makes sense that the Italian culture disrespects woman, and it only makes sense Italian women let it happen. A lack of self esteem will allow for this to happen. Perhaps its a stretch… (69-agree vs. 17-disagree)
COMMENT-2 wrote (Posted 2009/12/14 at 8:18 PM ET): You can’t tell a country on the other side of the world not to have hot women in swimsuits on tv, It’s their culture, everyone knows italian men dont take no for an answer that’s why it’s a bad idea for young women to travel alone in Italy, and Greece also. Their culture is different from ours. Too bad. (15-agree vs. 40-disagree)
COMMENT-3 wrote (Posted 2009/12/14 at 11:02 PM ET): COMMENT-2 has a point……….. and I am European background as well so i have seen overthere what its like. dont expect anything overnight. (3-agree vs. 4-disagree)
COMMENT-4 wrote (Posted 2009/12/14 at 8:46 PM ET): You should see France’s pathetic TV. It’s the worst in Europe. (8-agree vs. 2-disagree) + (Posted 2009/12/14 at 9:39 PM ET): When muslim france and bankrupt britain were eating with their feet Italy was creating western civilization. We gave you everything. Go read a book. (8-agree vs. 14-disagree) + This doesn’t look too different to American and Canadian TV. Jerry Springer anyone. (7-agree vs. 1-disagree)
COMMENT-5 wrote (Posted 2009/12/14 at 8:47 PM ET): I think it’s great that this video shows the ridiculous positions Italian television puts women in. What many people posting here forget is that North America used to do this as well at the beginning of the 20th century. Yes, that’s over 100 years ago. But thankfully two wars with a lack of male companionship, a massive depression and cutthroat businesses that eked out every last potential customer has brought us to the point where many of us find women with brains, wrinkles, and some age attractive. My household loves the unnaturally violent and to be honest, television in Europe is just as bad. We just don’t realize it because we don’t watch it. For anyone who thinks that American television or movies are violent try watching some Japanese cartoons, and television shows, and you’ll find out what true violence is. From a real man, vive la free woman. (14-agree vs. 4-disagree)
COMMENT-6 wrote (Posted 2009/12/14 at 9:13 PM ET): This show totally reminds me of Extreme Makeover! The pressure on women to display themselves and be beautiful is certainly an ongoing debate in our society. Many theorists have done wonderful work in this area. I’d like to see women take it one step further and have popular cultural representations of more modest behavior, clothing and discussions around chastity, et cetera. It would be wonderful to find some positive examples and role models about young women. I still think its great to bring up stuff like this to get the debate going, but I’d love to see people who are working on transforming all of this stuff. I’m sure that will happen eventually, so its lovely to see that this article is in the bailiwick of this debate 🙂 (8-agree vs. 0-disagree)
COMMENT-7 wrote (Posted 2009/12/14 at 11:19 PM ET): First of all in response to COMMENT-1, the Catholic religion is not the only religion that disrespects women(but we won’t get into that topic here). You obviously have a very narrow minded view about the Italian culture,…. and are you saying that your wife has low self esteem? This so-called image problem and low self esteem that today’s women have, has been brought upon them mostly by other women, so stop blaming men and or Berlusconi, I’m sure many women voted for him. As one previous poster mentioned, today’s men are portrayed as bumbling fools and buffoons who can’t even hold a screwdriver properly …… do we ever see men up in arms? Two things, “this is show biz ” and ” sex sells ” it’s all about ratings, so lets all take a chill pill on this topic, because Zanardo’s DVD won’t change anything. BTW, she’s a very attractive lady. VIVA ITALIA !!! (1-agree vs. 0-disagree)

11 =*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*
Toward Healthy, United Italy

Umberto Eco addresses the inadequacies of the modern mass media Oct 19, 2008
[Q] – In an era such as this one, riddled with such stress that calls into question the very foundations of the society, what should the role of the intellectual be?
[Eco] – “In many countries, people don’t understand how a university professor could be so interested in the politics of his country. For us in Italy, it’s a normal thing. The role of the intellectual is must be that of Italo Calvino’s The Baron in the Trees. He [the intellectual] must sit on the fence and talk badly especially about his friends. From this perspective, the intellectual is able to understand reality – he has a better chance of understanding what is going on, and so gets involved. This is, moreover, the theory of Italian philosopher Bobbio in his 1955 book Politics and Culture, a book that Calvino surely read and became enthralled by. I fully share Vittorini’s thesis: The intellectual must never play the penny-whistle tune of revolution because that is done by the press. And he should not be in an ivory tower.”
[Q] – Why have Italians decided to again entrust the fate of the nation to Silvio Berlusconi?
[Eco] – “… bla-bla-bla…” (JIWON: …a real headache…)
[Q] – What three things would you never give up for anything?
[Eco] – “I’d be ready to give up everything – there you have it. Certainly it would greatly disappoint me if my library caught fire. There, maybe that’s what I wouldn’t be able to give up. But if the world collapsed, then the library could go to hell too. By now, I’ve managed to quit smoking. For now, I’m not able to give up Gin Martini on the rocks.”

Protesters in Rome Denounce Berlusconi Dec 5, 2009 / By New York Times
(…) Many of those who gathered after a call on Facebook to demonstrate expressed indignation about what they perceived as Mr. Berlusconi’s autocratic style in governing Italy. Others complained that after years in power, Mr. Berlusconi had done little to better the country. “This started with civil society, people who are touched by problems like unemployment and the economy and the environment and want things to change,” said Elisa Tottone, a teacher who lives in Rome. “Berlusconi is not dealing with Italy’s real problems. He only cares about his own.” (…) Some protesters on Saturday said they were also frustrated with the fractured opposition. “I’m disoriented because there is no opposition,” said a retired art historian, adding that the center-left was missing out on an “important moment” to capitalize on the country’s discontent. One analyst, a University of Florence political science professor, said he did not believe protests were the way to topple the prime minister. “The way to do it is to create a credible alternative to him,” he said. ”You can’t just oppose, you have to build a coalition.”

Berlusconi Attack Prompts Italy Soul Searching Dec 14, 2009 / By New York Times
EU parliament head condemns attack on Berlusconi Dec 14, 2009 / By EUbusiness.com
Pope Benedict XVI and Italian bishops condemn attack on Berlusconi Dec 15 2009 / By Catholic News Agency
Silvio Berlusconi’s Attack: Italian Readers Give Mixed Reactions Dec 15 2009 / By Only Kent (blog)
Opponents fear Berlusconi will gain from sympathy Dec 15 2009 / By First Post

Italy Govt Calls For Wed Vote Of Confidence For Budget Dec 15 2009 / By Wall Street Journal
The center-right government of Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi has a strong majority in the country’s parliament.

10 =*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*
Toward the Healthy Opposition
(JIWON: Please look. This political happening clearly indicates what kind of Politician the Italian voters want. For part of Italian voters, sex-scandal-or-not is not an issue. In my view, they are waiting for the Italian Politician, whose capability lies on how to solve Economic Problem. Still, I keep wondering why Dario Francescini lost his battle… inside his party.)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democratic_Party_(Italy)
On 25 October 2009 Pier Luigi Bersani was elected new secretary of the party. On 7 November, Bersani was declared secretary, Rosy Bindi was elected party president.

The Berlusconi Attack: Will Italy’s Leader Gain Sympathy? Dec 17, 2009 / By Channelnewsasia.com
(…) Berlusconi is now the recipient of bipartisan sympathy. Democratic party leader Pierluigi Bersani visited Berlusconi at the hospital on Monday, while Ezio Mauro, editor of La Repubblica, which has been hounding Berlusconi even more than usual in recent months, declared in an editorial that there is no space to justify any act of violence: “First because it is so grave in itself, and also because it could lead to a tragic season that we have already experienced in the worst years of our life,” a clear reference to the ideological terrorism that left hundreds dead in Italy in the 1970s and ’80s. There was also widespread condemnation of the tactics of opposition politicians Rosy Bindi and Antonio Di Pietro, who have suggested that Berlusconi’s scorched-earth approach to politics helped create a climate ripe for violence. (…)

Italy Opposition Elects Ex – Minister (Bersani) as New Leader (amid a blackmail scandal) Oct 25, 2009 / By New York Times
Sex scandal denies Italian left the moral high ground Oct 25, 2009 / By Irish Times
(…) However, just at a moment when the centre-left might have liked to occupy a high moral ground totally at odds with the image of scandal-plagued Mr Berlusconi, an ugly little skeleton emerged from the PD cupboard. (…) Wrong-footed by this embarrassing scandal, the three leadership candidates tried to put a brave face on matters by issuing a joint statement which called Mr Marazzo’s resignation “an act of responsibility”. (…) Needless to say, many commentators point out the potentially suspect nature of the timing of this latest scandal, coming on a weekend of strategic importance for the centre-left.

Dario Franceschini Hopes…: Italy opposition votes for leader amid scandal Oct 25, 2009 / By Guardian.co.uk
Dario Franceschini, a former Christian Democrat who was chosen as stopgap leader, is one of the two main contenders for the succession. But the favourite is Pierluigi Bersani, a tough ex-communist and former minister in the centre-left government which lost office last year. Bersani emerged from a ballot of party members with more than half the vote. Franceschini was hoping that vigorous attacks on Berlusconi would enable him to outflank his rival in the popular vote.

Does Berlusconi sense the end is near? Why did he do it? Aug 16, 2009 / By Guardian, George Turner
(…) If Berlusconi’s intention was to win the war of the airwaves before an autumn battle, his comments on TG3 may have dangerously overstepped the mark, as they have achieved what neither he or anyone else has previously, a united response from the opposition. Dario Francescini, leader of the largest opposition party il Partito Democratico, has threatened that if Berlusconi does not back down, he will mobilise in September to protect freedom of information in Italy, a statement that was supported by all of the party’s internal factions. All other opposition parties released strong statements condemning the prime minister’s comments. A united left, brought together on a platform of civil liberties and constitutional reform, may be the powerful force that Italy has continually failed to produce in the age of Berlusconi. For Italian politics this does indeed promise to be a “hot autumn”, but for Italy’s beleaguered prime minister, could this be his last?

09 =*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*
Chauvinist Berlusconi: Dear Feminists, Which Italy Do You Want? Do You Want to Return to Your Favorite 1970s? To That Instability, That Street Violence, & That Anthropological War?
(JIWON: Just in case,
Mr. Rupert Murdoch doesn’t want any of Google Fans to read his newspapers. His only interest is to start his commercial business in dying Italy. Therefore, I had to collect the TITLES of his Berlusconi-articles only, instead of posting its entire text.
)
Times Online – Search: Berlusconi 2619 results on Dec 16, 2009
Silvio Berlusconi is ruining Italy, Massimo Tartaglia felt before attack
16 December 2009 The Times, Richard Owen
Italian Facebook users surprised to find they are fans of Berlusconi
16 December 2009 The Times, Kathryn Seaton-Reid; Richard Owen
Silvio Berlusconi attacker says sorry for ‘cowardly’ act
15 December 2009 Times Online, Richard Owen
Silvio Berlusconi will need weeks of treatment after Milan attack
15 December 2009 The Times, Richard Owen
He’s down but don’t count Silvio Berlusconi out after attack
15 December 2009 Times Online, Richard Owen
Battered Berlusconi says it is a miracle he was not blinded by attack
14 December 2009 Times Online, Richard Owen
Silvio Berlusconi ‘had premonition of Milan attack’
14 December 2009 Times Online, Richard Owen
Berlusconi hit in the face with a model of Milan’s cathedral
14 December 2009 The Times, Richard Owen; Josephine McKenna
(JIWON: Therefore… while this attack is being described as Political Bravery outside Italy or Britain, only the Italians start calling this Italian a ‘Mentally Insecure Patient’. Please check the comment section. How many are REAL Italians? They are welcome to write whatever they want to express for or against their political leader. HOWEVER… How many “Kill-Berlusconi” comments are from the Foreigners, who have been brainwashed by Italian Media Mogul Rupert Murdoch, who wants to read this comment from his Italian readers… purely to help his Italian commercial business? Is this an Italian comment?)
Berlusconi hit in the face with a model of Milan’s cathedral Dec 14, 2009 / By Rupert Murdoch
COMMENT-Elizabeth Payne wrote (December 14, 2009 5:44 AM GMT): Can’t believe the sympathisers – next time could the assailant use the real cathedral rather that a model?
(JIWON: Meanwhile, I became curious how his Middle East Articles look like. Or… Palestine Articles, at least, since I know better than this businessman. Is this Billionaire Media Mogul scared of British/Diaspora Muslims/Jews threatening his commercial business either in Britain or in Arab world, while he is afraid of NOTHING Italian?)
Times Online – Search: Hamas+Abbas
Times Online – Search: Hamas+Corruption
Times Online – Search: Abbas+Corruption
Times Online – Search: Beinisch+Settlement
Times Online – Search: Beinisch+Corruption
(JIWON: Do I find anything productive information from those articles? You can try another Search, such as Times Online – Search: Hamas+PA or Times Online – Search: Hamas+Authority. Nothing special. Therefore, let’s return to the original issue.)

Chauvinist Berlusconi: Dear Feminists, Which Italy Do You Want? Do You Want to Return to Your Favorite 1970s? To That Instability, That Street Violence, & That Anthropological War?

How Silvio Berlusconi Uses Women on TV Nov 20, 2009‎ / By (American) Time
(…) Such figures are particularly shocking for women like Elisa Manna, who is old enough to remember Italy’s muscular feminist movement of the 1970s. “Back then, young women wanted to become doctors, lawyers — professional people,” says Manna, director of the Department of Cultural Policies Centre for Social Studies and Policies (CENSIS) in Rome. (…)

The Berlusconi Attack: Will Italy’s Leader Gain Sympathy? Dec 17, 2009 / By Channelnewsasia.com
(…) Berlusconi is now the recipient of bipartisan sympathy. Democratic party leader Pierluigi Bersani visited Berlusconi at the hospital on Monday, while Ezio Mauro, editor of La Repubblica, which has been hounding Berlusconi even more than usual in recent months, declared in an editorial that there is no space to justify any act of violence: “First because it is so grave in itself, and also because it could lead to a tragic season that we have already experienced in the worst years of our life,” a clear reference to the ideological terrorism that left hundreds dead in Italy in the 1970s and ’80s. (…)

He’s down but don’t count Silvio Berlusconi out after attack Dec 15, 2009 / By Timesonline, Richard Owen
(…) The centre Left is more divided than ever after the attack, and Mr Fini may have left it too late to mount a challenge. Many Italians fear a return to the instability and street violence of the 1970s and 1980s, and may back him if only to end what one commentator called “the anthropological war between two Italys that hate each other, and are incapable of talking.
Comments for this article 3
COMMENT-2 wrote (December 15, 2009 3:55 PM GMT): Actually the new leader of the left is Di Pietro. The personalisation of politics and the hate against Berlusconi destroys the left. In this sense Di Pietro is the best ally of Berlusconi.

Have Things Ever Gone Right for Italy? Dec 14, 2009 / By The Faster Times, Nathan Hegedus
Maybe the question we should be asking about Italy is not: What has gone wrong? Maybe we should be asking: When did it ever go right?
The bloodied face of Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi was on the front pages of all the Swedish newspapers I saw this morning. He was attacked by an apparently mentally ill man, who threw a statue at him, and fractured his nose and broke two teeth.
A horrifying attack that Reuters says is bringing about “soul searching,” after years of ugly escalating political tension, mostly surrounding Berlusconi and his criminal trials, Berlusconi and his women, Berlusconi and northern independence, Berlusconi and his … well, you get the idea.
But this is not all that is wrong with Italy. You’ve got the trash mess in Naples. You’ve got a demographic time bomb, as Italian women apparently stopped having babies. You’ve got dire economic news, with little hope of a turnaround. And in the US, the Amanda Knox murder trial has highlighted the arbitrariness of the Italian justice system (even if she does not quite deserve the angelic treatment she gets in the American press).
All the coverage has an elegiac tone – a European economic and cultural giant brought low.
But, really, when did Italy get up? It must have been one of those sneaky rises, driven by a post-WW II boom in the north and EU membership, hidden from view by the flash of constant government failure and Italy’s cultural and culinary wonders.
Let’s do a modern history review. The country did not even exist until 1861, a peninsula dominated by foreign powers and squabbling aristocrats. Then you have massive emigration, which is charming in the US now, but did not reflect well on Italy at the time. Then you have the shame of Fascism, Mussolini, a half-baked colonial empire and World War II. Then you have decades of political instability, political violence and crushing poverty in the south. And throughout, you have the dominance of organized crime and the persistence of corruption.
Then came Berlusconi and his circus, in and out of government, putting a stranglehold on the Italian media, an ever escalating cycle of political nastiness.
And now Berlusconi has two broken teeth.
But, to be hopeful, maybe this is Italy’s way. After all, the country made all sorts of progress during the turbulent 70s, 80s and 90s. Life is good there on most levels. Maybe there are good things happening there under the surface. Or, maybe, there is a “real” Italy enduring behind the chaos of centuries that keeps moving forward despite continual setbacks.

08 =*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*
Furious Berlusconi: I don’t tell dirty jokes! Every GAFFE is invented by the newspapers!!

Berlusconi: I don’t really like my job ‎Oct 21, 2009 / By CNN International – Daniela Deane ‎
In a wide-ranging interview with CNN’s Paula Newton, Berlusconi also discussed some of the controversial statements he has made, including calling U.S. President Barack Obama “tanned.” He denied the comment was a gaffe. “I have never made any gaffes, not even one. Every gaffe is invented by the newspapers.” He said he always thinks before he speaks. “I tell stories and tell jokes,” he said. “I only tell jokes that can be heard by anyone. I’m always conscious of what we are talking about.”
Berlusconi said his supposed gaffes, like the time he left German Chancellor Angela Merkel waiting by the side of the Rhine while he finished a call on his mobile, were “invented by the papers.” Berlusconi explained the incident to CNN, saying had been on the phone to Turkey’s PM Recep Tayyip Erdogan. Afterwards Merkel — who he described as “happy” — asked him if the call had been successful.
Another time, he startled Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II during a group photo at Buckingham Palace when he shouted over to the American president: “Mr. Obama! It’s Berlusconi.” This prompted the queen to raise a gloved hand and complain: “Why does he have to shout?” Berlusconi told CNN “the Queen defended me.”

Berlusconi talks: ‘I’m liked and loved by all people in politics’ ‎Oct 26, 2009 / By CNN, Paula Newton
On Berlusconi …: I have always treated everyone well — never disappointed anyone, deceived them — dealt with people very openly. I’ve always been able to make everyone feel at home. Everybody knows that I have a sense of friendship. I’m loyal. I always say what I think. I don’t have any hidden thoughts. I speak openly. I have a playful nature and my cheerfulness is contagious. Even in international meetings like the G8, I bring some cheerfulness and optimism to the group.
On the secret of his success …: The secret [of my success] is to commit myself a lot, to work very hard, not to leave anything undone. To aim for 10 if you want to achieve eight and to consider others a great deal.
On why he entered politics …: There were the forces of the Left, who were, unfortunately for Italy, having their roots in the Communist party and Communist ideology. I couldn’t imagine that the country where I had lived, where I had great success as the first Italian entrepreneur, that it would fall prey to these people.
On growing up…: A man is what he becomes in early life … in the examples given by the family and what he sees and learns at school. My father was captured [by the Nazis] and my mother was a very courageous woman. She worked as a secretary and had to keep two children and her parents. Milan was being bombed by the Allies, and it was necessary to maintain the family there. I learned to make sacrifices, for example, the fact that I never go to bed without having done and concluded everything that I had to do.
On being a family man…: I think I have been a good father for my children (Berlusconi has five children from two marriages). I hope they have learned from my example. The presence of my family has been rather limited during these political and government years, but I do speak with my children every day on the telephone, and I comment on the most important events. We always have lunch or dinner over the weekend and when I’m at home.
On holding the top job …: I’m doing what I do with a sense of sacrifice, I don’t really like it. Not at all. I don’t like it because very often there is a lot of dirty dealing. There is really the gutter press — worse than that — the shameless and sickly. I would say that I’m doing this out of a sense of duty.
On why there’s no other person fit for the job …: Italians have honored me by putting their trust in me and there is a level of consensus which is embarrassing. I’m here, because unfortunately, it is considered that Berlusconi is the only leader able to hold the center-right together. On the Left, there is no respectable or credible leader. So, it is a cross which I’ll have to bear with sacrifice for some time to come.
On his continuing popularity …: When I go around, it’s embarrassing to see the affection showered upon me. I know that people can change their opinions, and I am aware of that, but I must say that I just note the fact that I am close to the heart of many Italians. They show this to me very often. I’ve always been liked by those who have worked with me. I’m liked and loved by all people in politics.
On being Italian …: I was lucky to be born in a country which determined the history of the world. I am what I am because I am Italian. I studied the history of Italy. I read Italian literature. I know my country well. So, I am 100 percent Italian. I hope I express everything positive of what it means to be Italian.
On gaffes …: I have never made a gaffe. The gaffes have been invented the papers. I tell stories and tell jokes. I don’t tell dirty jokes. I only tell jokes that can be heard by anyone. And I’m always conscious of what we are talking about.
On the press …: One day, I had dinner with [Former UK Prime Minister] Mrs Thatcher in Bermuda. She asked me what my work schedule was. I said, ‘I get up at seven and go to bed at two-thirty.’ ‘I work until one, the newspapers arrive for the next day. I read them. I get furious, and then I go to bed and sleep on it and in the morning I am optimistic again.’ She said, ‘It’s impossible. You can’t govern and read the newspapers. How do you do it? I only read the articles that are positive for me and my government, which are given to me by my press officer. I said, ‘When I get back to Italy, as of tomorrow, I’m going to follow the Thatcher system. You bring me articles which only say positive things about what I do.’ Well, I didn’t see my press agent for two months!

07 =*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*
Hot Berlusconi: I Must Be Heard! I’m Not Impotent!!

Please check
🙂 Barenboim’s Carmen: What happened on Dec 7, 2009? (Dec 7, 2009)
COLLECTION-1: JEALOUSY of the DAY!
Silvio snubs ‘Carmen’ for night at movies Dec 9, 2009 / By Independent, Michael Day
While Italy’s elite were at La Scala, embattled PM was next door at the multiplex (…) Mr Berlusconi stole away from Milan for a trip to a nearby multiplex, where he took in the high-octane effects-laden US blockbuster 2012. (…) cheers erupted from the cinema audience. It wasn’t clear if the applause was meant for the fictional premier or his real-life counterpart. But Mr Berlusconi was in no doubt, and at roughly the same time that Rachvelishvili stood for her 14-minute ovation at the Scala, he rose and took a bow of his own, film-goers told La Repubblica. (…) Celebrities at La Scala suggested that he had missed a fantastic Carmen. (…)

Rolling Stone Italy names Berlusconi 2009 rock star Nov 23, 2009 / By Reuters
Editor of Rolling Stone Italy said the 73-year-old media mogul had been chosen unanimously by the magazine’s editorial staff. “This year the choice was unanimous, for his obvious merits due to a lifestyle for which the words ‘rock and roll’ fall short,” Editor said in a statement. “Rod Stewart, Brian Jones, Keith Richards in their prime were schoolboys compared to him.” (…) Editor denied that his magazine had any political agenda behind its choice. “We are far from favoring left or right … Silvio Berlusconi’s daily behavior, his furious vitality, his inimitable lifestyle have given him, especially this year, incredible international popularity,” he said.

Berlusconi to give evidence in court: “I’m NOT impotent!!!” Sep 6, 2009 / By Telegraph.co.uk
As part of a counter-attack against his increasingly vociferous critics at home and abroad, Silvio Berlusconi is suing an Italian newspaper, L’Unita, for two million euros for libel after the paper ran articles claiming he suffered from erectile dysfunction and used Viagra. (…) The three-times prime minister, who this week described himself as “Superman” for what he had achieved in office since being re-elected last year, wants his supporters to know that he is in perfect physical condition, his lawyers said. “Mr Berlusconi is ready to go to court to explain that not only is he not a big lecher, but also that he is not impotent,” said the most senior member of his legal team, Niccolo Ghedini. “L’Unita cannot write that someone is impotent or lecherous without expecting that the person will get upset and react. “They have overstepped the mark and we will see what they’re able to prove in court. “Why on earth should Mr Berlusconi be prevented from explaining to 20 million Italians, his affectionate voters, that he is in perfect working order?”
(JIWON: Ho-Ho-Ho! I am still laughing. I think this is the most hilarious article I’ve read during Silvio-Scandal. What an Italian guy! I wish our prime minister the longest, the healthiest life… ho-ho-ho!)

Berlusconi says is best leader in Italy’s history Sep 10, 2009 / By Reuters
Social Fabric | Berlusconi Talks Textiles Sep 10, 2009 / By Is-It-New-York-Times?
“I’m currently at 68.4 percent in the approval ratings!” he boasted. “And it’s not just because I’m handsome and not just because I’m young and capable. I also know how to transform this country and get things done.

Berlusconi warns AC Milan coach Leonardo: I must be heard Aug 18, 2009 / By Tribalfootball.com
AC Milan president Silvio Berlusconi has warned coach Leonardo that he expects “to be heard”. Victory over Juventus in the Trofeo Berlusconi last night has eased the pressure on Leonardo, but Berlusconi said: “The coach takes care of the training, but the president must be heard. (…) And added: “AC Milan can be a leader in Italy and in Europe, playing a little more intelligently from a tactical point of view.” (…)

06 =*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*
La Dolce Berlusconi: Still… Opposition Can’t Beat Berlusconi…

La Dolce Berlusconi Oct 13, 2009 / By Washington Post, Anne Applebaum
(…) But in the end, even that dominance can’t explain all of his votes. There has to be something appealing about Berlusconi himself as well. Severgnini has called him a “mirror” of modern Italy, and one sees what he means: (…) And precisely because he is a caricature, he gets away with things that other people can’t. One hears Italians regale one another with Berlusconi stories and then howl with laughter.
Besides, with Berlusconi as your prime minister, you don’t have to take yourself too seriously.

Berlusconi’s Spat With Finance Minister Resolved Oct 27, 2009
(…) “The government’s policy has always been based on two pillars: fiscal discipline and economic growth. It’s clear that now we have to insist on growth,” said a source close to Berlusconi. (…)

So Far… This Is What Has Happened.

Please check
🙂 From Barenboim: Will Umberto Eco Endorse My Requests to German Government? (Nov 11 – Dec 17, 2009)
World unemployment up despite economic recovery Nov 5, 2009 / By The Associated Press
(…) Unemployment rates in the 30 wealthy countries (…) from a low of 3.5% in the Netherlands to 18.3% in Spain (…)
Spanish PM vows sweeping reforms to boost economy Nov 23, 2009 / By AFP
With Spain facing its worst recession in decades (…) Spain’s unemployment rate has doubled over the past two years to hit nearly 18%, the highest level in Europe, with construction workers leading the job losses. (…)
I happened to listen to the radio news when it reported Something Europe and Something Jobless. Since I missed half of it, I wanted to know in which European country 25% of young people were left jobless. I couldn’t find what I wanted. Instead, SPAIN was what I got. THEREFORE, Spanish Prime Minister Zapatero’s disgusting behaviors in Palestinian Ramallah was purely part of his election campaign… to fool his Spanish people. Wasn’t it?
Britain Remains the ‘Sick Man of Europe’ Nov 16, 2009 / By BusinessWeek
Once the most dynamic economy in the Old World, Britain is now lagging neighbors France and Germany in exiting its longest recession since WW II (…)
German Econ Council Sees German Recovery But No Upswing Nov 13, 2009‎ / By Wall Street Journal
(…) The average unemployment rate is likely to reach 9.4% in 2010, up from an expected 8.2% in 2009, and 7.8% last year, the council said. (…)
The Recession Isn’t the Only Burden That Germany Needs to Get Rid Of Nov 22, 2009 / By Wall Street Journal‎
So it’s agreed: Germany has emerged from recession, although barely. (…) Never mind. Meanwhile, Germany’s politicians can enjoy life in what BusinessWeek calls “Germany’s hippest and most affordable big city.” Perhaps because of its already-high unemployment rate of around 13%, Berlin’s economy experienced a smaller drop than any German region during the recent downturn, and a higher rate of job creation.(…)
Then, SPAIN was followed by WEDO’s Britain and WEDO’s German Berlin. Isn’t that interesting? I clicked several articles about this issue, but couldn’t find Italian information from any of them. So I had to start a specific research on ITALY.
World unemployment up despite economic recovery Nov 5, 2009 / By The Associated Press
FRANCE (…) The unemployment rate rose to 9.8% in September from 7.8% in 2008, according to the OECD. It is expected to hit 10% by the end of the year.
Treasurys Rally As Jobless Rate Rises To 26-Year High Nov 6, 2009 / By Wall Street Journal
(…) The U.S. cut 190,000 jobs in October (…) The unemployment rate was 10.2%, from 9.8% in September. Economists had expected 9.9%.
Unemployment expected to rise in 2010 in Italy Nov 20, 2009 / By thaindian.com
(…) Italy’s unemployment rate is expected to increase to 7.6% in 2009 and rise even higher in 2010 (…)
Please look. ITALY is better than any of these countries. How have the British media defined Berlusconi’s Government while ‘trumpeting’ Berlusconi-Scandal? How much have the Spanish Politicians laughed at Berlusconi-Scandal… especially while this Italian guy was visiting PM Zapatero as a VIP?
POLL-Italian services PMI contracts unexpectedly in Nov Dec 2, 2009 / By Forexyard
(…) Nonetheless, service sector firms remained optimistic that activity would be higher in 12 months time than in November. Italy pulled out of recession in the third quarter, expanding 0.6% after five quarterly contractions. PM Berlusconi’s government forecasts 0.7% GDP growth next year, after a 4.8% fall in 2009. (…)
Thanks to my another research on terrific German System about Opera/Symphony Orchestras in each state, this writing was delayed. I wanted to find the recent article. Something better was found. (…)

Berlusconi’s Spat With Finance Minister Resolved Oct 27, 2009
(…) “The government’s policy has always been based on two pillars: fiscal discipline and economic growth. It’s clear that now we have to insist on growth,” said a source close to Berlusconi. (…)

Does Berlusconi sense the end is near? Why did he do it? Aug 16, 2009 / By Guardian, George Turner
(…) It has been reported that the prime minister has told his closest supporters that he believes there will be an attempt to depose him in the autumn, and has already started preparing his “autumn campaign”. Leaders on the left believe that the real extent of the effect of the global economic crisis will reveal itself in the autumn, with Antonio di Pietro, leader of Italia dei Valori, telling Libero this Tuesday: “If it’s not the apocalypse, it will be something close to it.” (…)

Berlusconi pledges final blow to organized crime Aug 15, 2009 / By Reuters
(…) Responding to opposition criticism of chronic overcrowding in Italian prisons, Justice Minister Angelino Alfano said up to 35% of prison inmates in Italy were foreigners and he appealed to the European Union for support or funds to build more institutions. “Europe cannot close its eyes any more,” he said. (…)

Berlusconi unveils plan to boost Italy’s poor south Aug 9, 2009 / By Forbes
(…) Berlusconi told the Naples-based daily Il Mattino that an action plan for the south, focusing on tourism, infrastructures and high technology, will be among the government’s top priorities when parliament re-opens after the summer break. Despite large-scale public investment over more than 50 years, Italy’s southern regions remain much less developed than the rest of the country, with higher unemployment, inadequate infrastructures and lower output and income. (…)

05 =*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*
Women MPs Fight Back as Berlusconi Lashes Out

100000 Italian women protest ‘offensive’ Berlusconi AFP

Women MPs fight back as Berlusconi lashes out Oct 21, 2009
Berlusconi to Rosy Bindi: You are more beautiful than intelligent!
Rosy Bindi to Berlusconi: I’m not a woman at your disposal!
Senator Patrizia Bugnano to Chauvinist Berlusconi: You are no George Clooney!

Women MPs fight back as Berlusconi lashes out Oct 9, 2009
MP Giovanna Melandri to Diminutive Berlusconi: You have shown yourself to be “taller than well-mannered”!

04 =*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*
The Battle Is Not Only Against Berlusconi!

Italian women have to fight sexism in every aspect of their lives Sep 20, 2009 / By The Observer, Maria Laura Rodotà
Comments for this article 74
Comment-1 (20 Sep 09, 1:50am): [So please don’t consider us the sick women of Europe.] – No, I think that it is more that the men are the sick men of Europe but it is still the women who have to do something about it. Though having said that, I think that many other countries have similar problems.

With men routinely taking lovers and expecting their wives to cook, clean and look elegant, Silvio Berlusconi is only part of the problem

It’s not easy to explain, as an Italian woman, why so many of us continue to admire Silvio Berlusconi. Why some of us justify his brazen womanising, his appointments of beautiful girls to political office, his absurd macho posturing. And why others hate him but don’t speak up.

Today’s average Italian woman is a hybrid incomprehensible to foreigners: she’s overdressed, overworked and has the lowest self-esteem in the western world. If she has a job, she has to work overtime inside and outside the home (Italian men rarely clean or cook, and spend less time looking after the children). Unwritten laws demand that she is cute, thin, elegant and well made-up. For Italian men it’s normal to have a wife and a lover, which is why many have been amused by the adventures of the prime minister. The number of women in positions of power is small; in politics, almost all owe their status to men. The fear of being caricatured as a bitter feminist (who probably hasn’t got a sex life) is always strong. Women who overcome that fear are often ridiculed.

At Corriere della Sera we’ve experienced this at first hand. Last week I wrote an open letter to Italian women. The paper received an avalanche of comments online. Virtually all the women shared my anger. “Finally we’re talking about this,” they wrote. “We must organise and act.” But the men, including those on the left, responded differently: “What a lot of hysteria and poison.”

So we are beginning to understand that the battle is not only against Berlusconi. It’s against our friends, partners, colleagues and bosses. And if they are sexist, who can blame them? For the Italian male, it’s not going too badly. They can be family men as well as serial playboys; they can work hard and return to splendidly kept houses; they can be anti-Berlusconi, yet make jokes about women Berlusconi-style, and whoever gets offended is just a silly woman. And to enjoy a spectacle of serried ranks of starlets, they can watch the half-naked silent TV showgirls invented by Berlusconi’s channels. Some 80% of Italians receive most of their information from Rai and Mediaset which, indirectly or directly, are controlled by the prime minister.

But gradually a small number of women are beginning to ask whether it is time to act and how to do it. Some, like the political scientist Nadia Urbinati, warn that “the condition and treatment of women holds the mirror up to a country” and want to organise street demonstrations. Against Silvio and his escort girls? It would look ridiculous.

Many women doubt anything can be done, but others see a new awakening. Perhaps Italian women should use one of their best characteristics: the ability to be real ball-breakers. If we used this skill in a targeted and determined way, Italian men who have made themselves in Berlusconi’s image would have to change their ways. So please don’t consider us the sick women of Europe. At least not yet. We can do something.

Maria Laura Rodotà is the former editor of Italian women’s magazine Amica and a columnist with Corriere della Sera.

03 =*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*
Academic Women Fight Back Against ‘SEXIST’ Berlusconi

Op-Ed Contributor Italian Women Rise Up Aug 26, 2009 /By New York Times
Academic women fight back against ‘sexist’ Silvio Berlusconi Sep 27, 2009 / By The Observer, Tom Kington in Rome

Towards the end of her career as one of Italy’s most famous and loved leading ladies, the Roman actress Anna Magnani instructed her make-up artist not to conceal the lines and wrinkles on her face. “Leave them all there,” she said. “I spent a lifetime earning them.”
Magnani is now celebrated as a role model for a new generation of Italian feminists, galvanised by sex scandals involving prime minister Silvio Berlusconi, and a daily diet of sexist imagery in the media. Archive footage of Magnani’s bon mot appears in a short documentary which has become a word-of-mouth sensation online in Italy. Il Corpo delle Donne, or The Body of Women, is an acid critique of the routine sexism that pervades commercial Italian television.
In the film Magnani’s humorous dignity is contrasted with clip after clip featuring semi-naked showgirls and Botoxed presenters, all enduring programme formats designed to reveal as much flesh as is permissible at prime time, with a coruscating commentary by director Lorella Zanardo. More than half a million viewers have so far watched Il Corpo delle Donne and last month the film was shown and discussed on one of the country’s most popular talk shows.

After a summer of sleaze in which Berlusconi has been variously accused of “frequenting minors”, sleeping with an escort girl and holding debauched parties at his Sardinian villa, a feminist backlash is gaining momentum. The target is not only Berlusconi but the wider culture of a country in which a prime minister could survive such allegations.

According to Chiara Volpato, an academic at Milan’s Bicocca University, matters hit rock bottom when Berlusconi’s lawyer said his client would never pay for sex with an escort because the prime minister is merely an “end user” of women: “The choice of language really summed up how far we have sunk.”
This summer a group of academics, including Volpato, persuaded 15,000 people to sign a petition asking the wives of world leaders to boycott the G8 conference in Italy in protest at the plight of women in Berlusconi’s Italy.

Female judges, senators, nuns, historians and businesswomen circulated two more petitions calling for an end to sexism on television, while the European court of human rights will decide if Berlusconi can be sanctioned for sexism after two politicians, Donata Gottardi and Anna Paola Concia, complained to the court about his “continuous and repeated disrespectful statements about the lives and the dignity of women”.

Last week, when journalist Maria Laura Rodotà published an open letter to Italian women in Corriere della Sera calling for a “New Feminism”, she was overwhelmed with responses. “It was like uncorking a bottle,” she said. Protest is also emerging on the right. An article damning Berlusconi for promoting beautiful young women to political positions has been written by academic Sofia Ventura and published by a think-tank run by Berlusconi’s ally Gianfranco Fini.

Times were not always so bad. Italian women can draw inspiration from a proud record of winning rights in the 1970s, when 20,000 feminists would fill Rome’s streets on protest marches. Despite fierce resistance from the Vatican, divorce was legalised in 1974 after a referendum, and parliament legalised abortion in 1978.
“In an Italy with no divorce, secret abortions and huge inequality in the home, feminism achieved nothing short of an earthquake,” said Miriam Mafai, a former parliamentarian and veteran journalist who helped to launch the Italian daily La Repubblica in 1976.
But in recent years the Vatican has been making up lost ground. Abortion may be legal, but women have reported Catholic doctors refusing to supply even morning-after pills. And in the prime minister the unreconstructed Italian male has found a 21st-century hero.

Zanardo said that television was playing a crucial role in demeaning women and damaging their self-esteem: “Eighty per cent of Italians who watch TV use it as their sole source of information and 80 per cent of the women featured on TV are either sex objects or mere decoration.” As young girls bred on Italian TV increasingly dream of life as a velina, or showgirl, their mothers are often too tired to protest, she added. “Between jobs and housework, Italian women now work two hours a day longer than the European average.”
For now, the modern feminist revolt remains largely confined to universities and national newspapers. Despite the flurry of activity, Ventura said she was pessimistic about rank-and-file women joining the petition-signing intellectuals who are mobilising: “The alarm is sounding in universities but not elsewhere, this is not yet a political problem. Feminism achieved a lot first time round, but evidently it did not reach deep enough.”
Zanardo disagrees, claiming protest is growing outside university corridors, but people do not know where to look. “It’s happening on the internet. The proof was when the University of Bologna withdrew erotic images it used in advertising after a huge online protest.”

There are other signs. A risqué TV comedy show on a Berlusconi channel was moved to a later time slot after protests from a parents’ group. And when a blonde model on Berlusconi’s flagship football programme exposed a breast during a dance routine she was promptly sacked. “I don’t think that would have happened in the past,” said Zanardo.
Zanardo’s website is registering complaints about lewd images on TV and is planning courses in schools “to help children defend themselves from this television”. The response to Il Corpo delle Donne, she says, has been overwhelming: “People who watch Italian TV all the time have told me ‘Thanks, it’s the first time I really see what is going on’.”

02 =*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*
Berlusconi’s Children Come Out to Defend Father Berlusconi…

WORKING…

01 =*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*
How & Why Murdoch’s British Media started his Anti-Berlusconi Campaign…

TOO TIRED TO SEARCH THIS AGAIN…
One can find anything while visiting internet source. He’d better start from Murdoch’s Timesonline… and then all the British media… and then all the international media…

Including
Grandpa Silvio ‘is impotent’ June 7, 2009 / By Timesonline
The woman once rumoured to be the Italian leader’s mistress has turned against him, saying he has no real power (…)

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: